Where to Get Your Crawfish Fix in the French Quarter

Where to Get Your Crawfish Fix in the French Quarter

If you’re lucky enough to visit New Orleans in the springtime, you absolutely must indulge in a local’s favorite: crawfish. Crawfish season coincides with festival season and ranges from late December to early summer, depending on the year. The peak of crawfish season usually comes in March and April, and there’s no better way to enjoy spring weather than to pinch and peel boiled crawfish outdoors. To get the ultimate crawfish experience while visiting the Crescent City, you’ll want to start your day off with a crawfish tail omelet at Criollo. Better yet, if you’re here on a Saturday, indulge in our Daily “Benedict” Special, the Creole Benedict, which features Creole Risotto & Crawfish Cake, Poached Egg and Citrus Hollandaise. While you’re spending your day exploring the French Quarter, stop at one of these locations to check “eat boiled crawfish in New Orleans” off your bucket list! Where to get boiled crawfish in the French Quarter: Deanie’s Seafood – 841 Iberville St. This French Quarter location of the classic local’s favorite serves up boiled crawfish, shrimp and crabs in season. You can also find plenty of other Gulf Coast favorites like oysters on the half shell, stuffed flounder, barbeque shrimp pasta, and seafood platters. Original French Market Restaurant – 1001 Decatur St. This restaurant has been serving fresh Gulf Seafood for more than 200 years. Here you can find a variety of boiled seafood, including boiled crawfish by the pound, as well as boiled jumbo shrimp, blue crabs and snow crabs. J’s Seafood Dock – 1100 N Peters St., Stall # 25 For something casual, J’s Seafood Dock in the French Market...
Tennessee Williams New Orleans Literary Festival 2016: Read All About It

Tennessee Williams New Orleans Literary Festival 2016: Read All About It

Beginning March 30, 2016, New Orleans will celebrate renowned author Tennessee Williams with its annual literary festival. As one of the major hosts of the festival (after all, Williams featured Hotel Monteleone as a symbol of New Orleans in his play The Rose Tattoo and often stayed at the hotel), we are honored to be a part of such a storied literary tradition. Read on for a detailed outline of this year’s Tennessee Williams New Orleans Literary Festival. The Speakers This year’s speaker lineup includes plenty of New Orleanians, including award-winning author Tom Piazza, culinary writer Poppy Tooker, geographer Richard Campanella, “Queen of Bounce” Big Freedia and Alys Arden, whose recent debut novel, The Casquette Girls, began in serialized form on the Internet and garnered over 1.2 million reads online before being picked up for a publishing deal. View a complete list of speakers here. Get all the details on Tennessee Williams Festival! @TWFestNOLA Click To Tweet The Venues Of course, our hotel is one of the main venues of the festival, but several other area businesses are opening their doors to welcome Tennessee Williams Literary Festival participants. The Historic New Orleans Collection, a museum and research center in the French Quarter, will host master classes for writers looking to improve their craft and presence. Look for live music and theatrical performances at The Palm Court Jazz Café, Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré and and Southern Rep Theatre. Other venues include the Hermann-Grima and Gallier Historic Houses, Muriel’s Jackson Square Restaurant, The Williams Research Center, and more. How to Participate You can purchase tickets for the literary festival via their...
Which New Orleans Cemetery Is Best?

Which New Orleans Cemetery Is Best?

New Orleans is known around the world for the unique way we bury our dead, in above ground cemeteries and mausoleums. But what if it’s your first trip to New Orleans and you want to make the most of your short stay here? The decision of which New Orleans cemetery is best is a matter of personal preference, so while we can’t declare a winner, we can help you understand key differences between the most popular New Orleans cemeteries so that you can schedule a trip to your favorite burial ground. St. Louis Cemetery No. 1 One of the oldest, most famous and most haunted cemeteries in New Orleans is also the closest to Hotel Monteleone. St. Louis Cemetery No. 1 is located just a few short blocks from our hotel at the corner of St. Louis & Basin Streets, but you’ll need to join a tour group to visit this one. In 2015, the Archdiocese of New Orleans began restricting access to this historic cemetery in order to protect and preserve it for generations to come. Founded in 1789 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, this cemetery houses more than 700 tombs and over 100,000 deceased, including the graves of Voodoo Queen Marie Laveau as well as noted New Orleanians Etienne de Bore, who was a pioneer in the sugar industry, Homer Plessy, of the landmark Supreme Court segregation decision Plessy vs. Ferguson, and world famous chess champion Paul Morphy. This cemetery was also featured in the classic 1969 film, Easy Rider, and houses the pyramid-shaped tomb that actor Nicholas Cage has reserved as his final resting...
Celebrate Irish History in New Orleans this St. Patrick’s Day

Celebrate Irish History in New Orleans this St. Patrick’s Day

If there is one thing we have an abiding love of, it’s history. We’re celebrating our own 130th anniversary this year, and while we’ve been standing tall on Royal Street since 1886, the history of the Irish in New Orleans goes back even further. A Brief History of the Irish in New Orleans Irish immigrants have played an important role in New Orleans since shortly after the area was settled by Europeans. In 1769, the Dublin-born, Spanish-raised Alejandro O’Reilly was appointed Governor of Louisiana. He came to New Orleans to seize control and re-establish order during a revolt. While O’Reilly left New Orleans after just a year, some of the Irishmen who came to town with him stayed. New Orleans saw a flood of Irish immigrants during the infamous Great Famine of the 1840s. For many immigrants, the decision to choose New Orleans over New York or other cities in the Northeast was easy… New Orleans was a smaller, Catholic city with easier access to the sparsely populated lands of the interior of the United States. By the mid-19th century, the Irish made up nearly a quarter of the population of New Orleans. Although the Civil War and the economic decline that followed severely slowed the influx of Irish immigrants to New Orleans, the Irish community here became more tight-knit than ever, leaving a lasting influence throughout the city. Today, the impact of Irish immigrants can be seen and heard all over New Orleans. New visitors may expect to hear locals speak with a Southern drawl, but many local accents are more reminiscent of Brooklyn than a Georgia peach....

Find Out Where Locals Eat in New Orleans’ French Quarter

New Orleans infamous restaurant scene can be overwhelming. In fact, even individual neighborhoods are dense with so many unique, locally owned bars and restaurants that it’s hard to know where to begin!                     The Carousel Bar & Lounge inside Hotel Monteleone.  Locals have time to do the legwork — some consider it a personal badge of victory to try all the restaurants in any given area; others keep detailed spreadsheets of restaurants they’ve tried and where to go next (seriously!). With the French Quarter in mind, here’s a list of a few standout places where locals eat in New Orleans. Where Locals Eat in New Orleans’ French Quarter   Breakfast/Brunch Brennan’s — Brennan’s is a fine-dining institution we’d recommend any meal of the day (and any day of the year)… but locals know it’s all about their breakfast. With a James Beard-nominated chef at the helm and fresh off a stunning interior renovation, Brennan’s is the most unforgettable place to start your day. But maybe not the healthiest…you must order the Bananas Foster. EAT New Orleans — This sunny space is also BYOB, but dishes like Eggs Cochon (Pulled pork cake over mustard greens, two poached eggs, Creole hollandaise, with grits and a homemade biscuit) are enough to give you a buzz. Criollo — Criollo is one of those restaurants where you could eat breakfast every day and not get tired of it: every single day features a different Eggs Benedict. Who needs daily bread when there’s daily Benedict? (There are also beignets, Bloody Marys, and so much more).   Lunch Felipe’s Taqueria — Fast, affordable,...

Lights, Camera, Action: Criollo’s New Lunch Menu

If a picture is worth 1,000 words, a video has to be worth at least a million. Which is why we’re letting the footage (and the food) do the talking this time around. Watch the video below to see a few standout items from Criollo Restaurant & Lounge’s lunch menu. We always look forward to lunch in particular: we can’t wait to try these new lunch options featuring seasonal ingredients and the signature elegance from our chefs. Who’s hungry? Video: Lunch at Criollo Introducing our new lunch menu, kicking off this week at Criollo. We're open for lunch everyday from 11:30am-2:30pm, making us the perfect spot for a mid-day treat. You're not going to want to miss this. Posted by Criollo Restaurant on Monday, 25 January 2016 The menu items seen in the video above include: Classic Reuben with shaved corn beef, gruyere, rye bread, and Russian dressing Jumbo Lump Crab Cakes with red and yellow tomato concasse, hot crab, shrimp, and artichoke dip Four Cheese Ravioli with white spinach and yellow tomato fondue Hot Pulled Pork with marinated red cabbage and onions, a toasted onion roll, and horseradish caraway sauce Oh, and one more thing: we think every meal should start with bread. Don’t you agree? New lunch options from @criollonola ... who's #hungry? Click To...